Tuesday, December 29, 2009

BUNNY LEE AKA (STRIKER LEE)








Lee began his career working as a record plugger for Duke Reid's Treasure Isle label in 1962, later performing the same duties for Leslie Kong. He then moved on to work with Ken Lack, initially in an administrative role, before taking on engineering duties. Lee then moved into producing (i.e. financing) records himself, his first hit record coming with Roy Shirley's "Music Field" on WIRL in 1967. Lee then set up his own Lee's label, the first release being Lloyd Jackson's "Listen to the Beat".[3] He produced further hits during 1967-68 by Lester Sterling andStranger ColeDerrick MorganSlim Smith and The Uniques ("My Conversation"), Pat Kelly, and The Sensations, establishing him as one of Jamaica's top producers. Between 1969 and 1972 he produced classic hits including Slim Smith's "Everybody Needs Love", Delroy Wilson's "Better Must Come", Eric Donaldson's "Cherry Oh Baby", and John Holt's "Stick By Me".
Lee was a pioneer of the United Kingdom reggae market, licensing his productions to the Palmer Brothers (Pama) and Trojan Records in the early 1970s.
The mid-1970s saw Lee work with his most successful singer, Johnny Clarke, as well as Owen Gray and Cornell Campbell, and along withLee "Scratch" Perry, he broke the dominance of Coxsone Dodd and Duke Reid. This era also saw the emergence of the "flying cymbal" sound on Lee's productions, developed by drummer Carlton 'Santa' Davis, with Lee's session band, The Aggrovators.
Lee was instrumental in producing early dub music, working with his friend and dub pioneer King Tubby in the early 1970s. Lee and Tubby were experimenting with new production techniques, which they called "Implements of sound."[citation needed] Working with equipment that today would be considered primitive and limiting, they produced tracks that consisted of mostly the rhythm parts mixed with distorted or altered versions of a song.
With all the bass and drum ting now, dem ting just start by accident, a man sing off key, an when you a reach a dat you drop out everything an leave the drum, an lick in the bass, an cause a confusion an people like it...
Lee encouraged Tubby to mix increasingly wild dubs, sometimes including sound effects such as thunder claps and gunshots. In addition to King Tubby, dub mixers Prince Jammy andPhilip Smart also worked extensively on Lee's productions, with most of Lee's dubs from 1976 onwards mixed by Jammy.
In addition to dub sides and instrumentals, Lee would be one of the first producers to realize the potential of reusing the same rhythm tracks time and time again with different singers anddeejays partly out of necessity - unlike some of the other major producers Lee did not have his own studio and had to make the most of the studio time he paid for.
The latter half of the 1970s saw Lee work with some of Jamaica's top new talent, including Linval ThompsonLeroy Smart, and Barry Brown.
By 1977 Joe Gibbs and Channel One Studios with the Hookim Brothers became "the place to be", reducing Lee's prominence. However, during the late 1970s Lee produced almost everydeejay, notably Dennis AlcaponeU-RoyI-RoyPrince JazzboU BrownDr AlimantadoJah StitchTrinity, and Tapper Zukie. Most of these were quick productions, usually to classicStudio One or Treasure Isle riddims. The aim was to get deejay versions on the street quickly and were usually voiced at Tubby's studio in the Waterhouse district of Kingston. In the early 1980s, Lee purchased Gibbs' studio, and continued producing, albeit on a less prolific basis than in the 1970s.
In 1982 an episode of the Channel 4 documentary series Deep Roots was dedicated to Lee. Filmed in in the control room of King Tubby's studio it included a lengthy conversation with him and some of the musicians he has worked with over the years including Delroy WilsonJohnny ClarkePrince Jazzbo and Jackie Edwards. It then shows Lee producing a dub while Prince Jammy mixes. The program has been released on DVD in January 2008


Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

THE BALLOON FARM!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

WHAT A GREAT TRACK!




BLOSSOM TOES







Blossom Toes were an English psychedelic pop band active between 1967 and 1969. Initially known as The Ingoes, they were renamed and signed to manager Giorgio Gomelsky's Marmalade label. The original line-up comprised Brian Godding (born 19 August 1945, Wales) (guitar, vocals, keyboards), Jim Cregan (born James Cregan, 9 March 1946, YeovilSomerset) (guitar, vocals), Brian Belshaw (born 25 February 1944,WiganLancashire) (bass, vocals), and Kevin Westlake (born Kevin Patrick Westlake, 5 March 1947, DublinCo DublinEire — 30 September 2004) (drums).
The band's debut album, We Are Ever So Clean, is a classic example of quintessentially English psychedelia. On release, it was presented in the UK music magazine Melody Maker as "Giorgio Gomelsky's Lonely Hearts Club Band". Although not a major commercial success, tracks such as "What On Earth" or "Look At Me, I'm You" have helped give the album something of a cult period status as it is unearthed by successive generations of 60s retro fans. It was recently voted Number 40 in Record Collector’s list of the "100 Greatest Psychedelic Records".
If Only For A Moment saw the band taking a noticeably heavier and rockier direction, with Cregan and Godding's distinctive two-part guitar harmonies playing a prominent role. The album also marked the departure of Westlake, to be replaced, in turn, by John "Poli" Palmer and then Barry Reeves.
The quartet was dissolved in 1970. While Belshaw and Godding rejoined Westlake in B.B. Blunder, Cregan formed Stud with Jim Wilson and Charlie McCracken, before joining Family. He would find fame later in the decade with Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel and as a part of Rod Stewart's backing band.
The Blossom Toes contributed music to La Collectionneuse (1967), a film by French director Éric Rohmer and also appeared in "Popdown" (1967) by Fred Marshall.

Skip Bifferty






Skip Bifferty was a rock band formed in early 1966, when The Chosen Few (Featuring Alan Hull, later of Lindisfarne) from Newcastle upon Tyne changed their name and got a new singer, Graham Bell. Their outings on vinyl were few and far between, but included the much re-issued 1967 album Skip Bifferty, recently released with bonus Radio tracks as "The Story of Skip Bifferty" on Sanctuary Records. Some of their songs were covered by established artistes such as Cilla BlackThe Tremeloes and The Kingsmen ("Louie Louie"). They had a following on the "live" circuit and are remembered with great affection. Their manager was Don Arden, father of Sharon Osbourn

Sunday, December 6, 2009

PRIMITIVE SOUL CHRISTMAS!!!!!!!!!! THIS FRIDAY!!!!!! AT THE BOOT!



IN HAPPENING NORFOLK VA!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ALL OR NOTHING AT COUS COUS NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT



NEXT SATURDAY NIGHT IN RICHMOND VA BE THERE OR BE SQUARE!

DOBIE GRAY





The "In" Crowd is the song which first brought international recognition to Dobie Gray. Written by Billy Page, it extolled the cool sassiness and hipness of being "In" in the mid-sixties. The record was in the charts amid the top 10s and 20s for three months. The Ramsey Lewis Trio’s hit version of it came two years later.
   Gene Page, brother of Billy, was the arranger who gave "The 'In' Crowd" its big, Motown-like sound. In fact, the general perception at the time was that it was a Motown record. This, in part, was due to Gene’s highly identifiable arrangements and his choice of instrumentation - which in those days was being heard on a number of Motown’s hit records. 

Friday, December 4, 2009

THANKS BROOKE!


The Impressions









AFTER THE END OF A CRAPPY DAY I HEARD THIS SONG AND IT MADE FEEL A WHOLE LOT BETTER!

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

FONTELLA BASS




The daughter of gospel singer Martha Bass (a member of the Clara Ward Singers), Bass showed great musical talent at an early age -- at just 5 years old she was providing the piano accompaniment for her grandmother's singing at funeral services, she was singing in her church's choir at six years old and by the time she was 9 she was accompanying her mother on tours throughout the American South and Southwest.
Fontella continued touring with her mother until the age of 16. As a teenager, Bass was attracted by more secular music. Throughout high school she began singing R&B songs at local contests and fairs. At 17, she started her professional career working at the Showboat Club near Chain of Rocks, Missouri. In 1961, she auditioned on a dare for the Leon Claxton carnival show and was hired to play piano and sing in the chorus for two weeks, making $175 per week for the two weeks it was in town. She wanted to go on tour with Claxton but her mother refused and according to Bass "... she literally dragged me off the train". It was during this brief stint with Claxton that she was heard by vocalist Little Milton and his bandleader Oliver Sain who hired her to back Little Milton on piano for concerts and recording.
Bass originally only played piano with the band, but one night Milton didn't show up on time so Sain asked her to sing and she was soon given her own featured vocal spot in the show. Milton and Sain eventually split up and Bass went with Sain; he also recruited male singer Bobby McClure and the group became known as "The Oliver Sain Soul Revue featuring Fontella and Bobby McClure".
With the support of Bob Lyons, the manager of St. Louis station KATZ, Bass recorded several songs released through Bobbin Records and produced by Ike Turner. She saw no notable success outside her home town. It was also during this period she met and subsequently married the noted jazz trumpeter Lester Bowie.

Two years later she quit the Milton band and moved to Chicago after a dispute with Oliver Sain. She auditioned for Chess Records, who immediately signed her as a recording artist. Her first works with the label were several duets with Bobby McClure, who had also been signed to the label. Released early in 1965, their recording "Don't Mess Up a Good Thing" (credited to Oliver Sain) found immediate success, reaching the top five at R&B radio and peaking at #33 at pop. In 1979 the song was covered by Ry Cooder with Chaka Khan on Cooder's album Bop 'Til You Drop.
Bass and McClure followed their early success with "You'll Miss Me (When I'm Gone)" that summer, a song that had mild success, reaching the Top 30 on the R&B chart, although it made no significant impression on the pop chart. After a brief tour, Bass returned to the studio. The result was an original composition with an aggressive rhythm section; backing musicians on the track included drummer Maurice White (later the leader of Earth, Wind, & Fire), bassist Louis Satterfield and tenor saxophonist Gene Barge, with the young Minnie Ripperton among the background singers.
The song "Rescue Me" shot up the charts in the fall and winter of 1965. After a month-long run at the top of the R&B charts, the song reached #4 at the pop charts and gave Chess its first million-selling single since Chuck Berry a decade earlier.
Bass followed with "Recovery," which did moderately well, peaking at #13 (R&B) and #37 (pop) in early 1966. The same year brought two more R&B hits, "I Can't Rest" (backed with "I Surrender)" and "You'll Never Know." Her only album with Chess RecordsThe New Look, sold reasonably well, but Bass soon became disillusioned with Chess decided to leave the label after only two years, in 1967. By her own account, she was effectively cheated out of her royalties for "Rescue Me", which she had co-written with pianist Raynard Miner:
"I had the first million seller for Chess since Chuck Berry about 10 years before. Things were riding high for them, but when it came time to collect my first royalty check, I looked at it, saw how little it was, tore it up and threw it back across the desk."
Bass demanded a better royalty rate and artistic control; she approached her then manager Billy Davis about securing her writing credit on the song but was told not to worry about it. When the record came out and her name was still not on it she was told it would be on the legal documents, but this never happened. She continued to agitate about the matter for a couple years but later recalled: "It actually side-stepped me in the business because I got a reputation of being a trouble maker."
Tiring of the mainstream music scene, she and husband Lester Bowie left America and moved to Paris in 1969, where she recorded two albums with the Art Ensemble of Chicago -- Art Ensemble of Chicago with Fontella Bass and Les Stances a Sophie (both 1970). The latter was the soundtrack from the French movie of the same title. Bass' vocals, backed by the powerful, pulsating push of the band has allowed the "Theme De YoYo" to remain an underground cult classic ever since.[citation needed] She also appeared on Bowie's The Great Pretender(1981) and All the Magic (1982).
Even with the success of "Rescue Me" it was many years and much litigation before Bass would be credited with her share of the songwriting and the royalties she actually deserved from the song. Some sources credit the climate for racial discrimination and the treatment of women in the music business for these issues at that point in time. Again, in 1993 Bass suedAmerican Express and Ogilvy & Mather for the unauthorized use of the song in a commercial for the credit card giant.